How To Set a Workout On Your Garmin Forerunner Watch

How To Set a Workout On Your Garmin Forerunner Watch

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GPS watches have come a long way from the simplistic functionality of “pace” and “time”; however, I have discovered that many Garmin watch owners have no idea how to utilize all of the features of their watch. In this post, I will guide you through the two ways to set a workout on your Garmin Forerunner 220 or higher.

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Hill Training

Hill Training

A good marathon plan will typically start with 4 weeks of hill training. Within those 4 weeks, the runner will work on three different hill workouts: hill sprints, medium hills, and long hills. I am always scoping out new hills in my long and easy runs, filing them away for the hill module to keep things interesting.

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Taper Madness (republished from October 2014)

Taper Madness (republished from October 2014)

This blog post is nearly two years old, but I thought I would republish it for some friends who are racing this coming weekend. Sometimes taper is the hardest part of training. I managed a 21 minute marathon PR after this particular piece was written.

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Enjoying a taper run on the Black Creek Greenway

 

Runners do this thing called “taper” in the weeks leading up to goal endurance race. Tapering is essentially a decrease in weekly miles run that allows for repair of muscles, storage of extra glycogen, and amply recovery before race day. It has been shown to increase performance somewhere between 2-8%, depending on how the tapering is done. The most effective tapering plans take into account a runners peak mileage, the length of the race, and the runner’s experience and goals. Plans that decrease intensity along with mileage have been shown to be far less effective than those that decrease mileage but maintain intensity.

But, all that said, that is not really what this post is about.

This post is about Taper Madness. It’s about what happens to your brain on taper.

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Plyometrics Workout (15-30 minutes)

Plyometrics Workout (15-30 minutes)

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Knee Tuck Jumps

The benefits of plyometric training for runners are well documented:

Turner, A. M.; Owings, M.; Schwane, J. A., Improvement in Running Economy After 6 Weeks of Plyometric Training. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 2003, 17 (1), 60-67.

Spurrs, R. W.; Murphy, A. J.; Watsford, M. L., The effect of plyometric training on distance running performance. European Journal of Applied Physiology 2003, 89 (1), 1-7.

But jump training offers more than just cardiovascular health, explosive power and endurance: it’s free, easy, and can be done in a small area of your home or apartment.

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Strides

Strides

Want to have faster leg speed? Want to run faster overall? Training for a 5k? 10k? half marathon? Marathon? well, then you should be doing some strides.

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You don’t need a GPS watch or a track to do this workout, just use a stretch of road.

Strides are a running workout where you accelerate to your sprint/1 mile race pace and run 60-100 meters and then slow back down again to recover. Typically they are done in sets of 5-10, and they are most beneficial when you fully recover between each one, jogging or even walking for at least a minute.

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Strengthening the Hip Area: The Myrtl Routine

Strengthening the Hip Area: The Myrtl Routine

Running after pregnancy was especially difficult. It literally felt like I was “falling apart” in my hips, upper thighs, and glutes; it felt like the muscles and tendons just would never be the same. But then I was introduced to coach Jay Johnson’s Myrtl Routine, which is a series of 12 exercises to strengthen the hip girdle. I recommend this routine to all runners, especially moms who are returning to the road after pregnancy.

The 12 movements include:

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